BIM – “It’s all about the data”!

BIM – “It’s all about the data”!

Attending conferences is always a good way to check out the mood of the market, gather first hand user insights and, of course, meet potential clients.  So last week I travelled half away across England to attend The BIM Conference held in a former 12th Century Cistercian Abbey.

buildinga

The thing that hit my eye when deciding whether to attend the conference was a seminar on

“Data Management”.  I thought it would be great opportunity to see what people have to say about the subject. Generally I have found in the past speakers at BIM conferences tend to concentrate on BIM concepts, delve into the process and procedures and the legal implications but tend to talk very generically about data / information.  Given “I” is one of the three letters it doesn’t seem to receive the exposure it truly deserves.

The first speaker was from the UK Government I thought it would be the standard BIM presentation about the Government backing BIM because of the cost savings it potential delivers, talking about process and procedures etc etc.  Therefore it was a great surprise when Fiona Moore (BIM Support Office UK BIM Task Force) clearly stated that the UK Government’s BIM Level 2 strategy was – “all about the data with data is capture throughout the design and construction phases and reused to make better informed decisions on future projects”.

I couldn’t have wished for a better opening to discuss the benefits of CodeBook Pro amazing ability to manage data across the major CAD / BIM platforms when you’re asked by other delegates what do you do. Given we have been shouting about load and clear for years, nearly 20 years!

Despite the emphasis placed on data the Data Management seminar failed to meet expectations with little or any content about data and was really about clash detection.  Which I fully appreciate it’s an integral and very important part to better design and identifying costly mistakes for construction commences – it’s not in any way about data management!

The UK Government’s BIM Strategy is a really good thing which it seems very committed to implementing on their building program, its gaining interest from governments across the globe and places the UK a head of the curve on BIM.  Its effect will be felt across the whole sector not just the Government building program.

The biggest issue I can see going forward is the casual way data along with data management is mentioned in passing with little detailed discussion and there is a significant failure by many in the sector to understand data and data management isn’t a trivial matter it’s the core of BIM

 

Buying the right tool for the job!

Buying the right tool for the job! Over the weekend preparing for a party cleaning the paths and patios in my garden with my high pressure washer broke 2/3 way in the job which hard already taken me 5 hours so far!

I made the fatal mistake when I bought this unit some 4 years ago thinking I was saving money by buying the one on offer which didn’t have full tool set because I didn’t think I needed and how much longer is going to take me without the patio cleaner tool !

So I quick trip down to the local DIY store to buy another to complete the job decided to break the bank ignore the financial secretary’s (my wife) spend guidance and bought the more expensive unit with all the tools. Having assembled the unit ready for use and unleashing it on the patio I quickly realised how my first purchase was a really poor investment decision because I completed the whole job re-cleaning everything I had done before in just 90 minutes.

Lesson learnt not all higher pressure washers are equal – yes do the same job but they don’t do it quicker or more easily. So I was saving money “Pound rich and Penny Poor”

It’s the same with BIM Data Management solutions – Not all data management solutions are equal. Choosing the right solution is paramount to gaining the maximum efficiency and cost benefits a data management solution can deliver.

Given the stage in BIMM (Building Information Modelling and Management) development users are starting to discover the management of data is not a trivial matter and it’s a rather large and complex element of the BIMM process.

Making the wrong choice is expensive and you rarely discover you have the wrong solution until your well into a project at which point it’s generally impossible to jump ship and you have to ride out the storm to the end. CodeBook Pro – Intelligent Room Data Management – Beyond Simple Room Data Sheets (RDS)

CodeBook Pro is a powerful enterprise solution delivering structured, centralised, rationalised and verified data. It’s simple and easy to use user interface provides access to a most comprehensive suite of functionality available equipping users to work on any size of project regardless of size, complexity or sector. Interfaces with the latest releases of all leading third-party design, CAD and BIM applications, including Revit® AutoCAD®, MicroStation and ArchiCAD.

Concern that Building Owners are not going to get what they require or what they expect from BIM

When considering the use of BIM, it is important to be clear about the expected benefits.  There is a danger in the rush to embrace the new ways of working optimism and expectation can lead to disappointment and wasted effort.  It is important to identify work flows, what data should be modelled and where it should be modelled.

A current hot topic is how to produce a BIM model during the design stage that could be developed during the construction adding richness and detail to provide the building owner with a meaningful database of information to assist the building owner manage their facility.

A design or construction BIM might be of limited value to a building owner.  Our discussions with design teams and contractors has highlighted concerns about managing expectations, and in order to make the data useful, who pays for the data creation and management.

Appointment documents tend to quote IFC’s or COBie, rather than an analysis of the data content.  If building owners do not understand how they will use the data, they are unlikely to receive a useful BIM and an opportunity will be wasted.

This blog tackles these issues and by means of several case studies explore how steps can be taken to ensure a worthwhile building owner information model.

Our experience of what is asked of the design and construction teams is free BIM :

–          More often than not, the terms of engagement specify deliverables. These are framed in terms of IFC’s or Cobie. These are a mechanism, rather than a spec of what data needs to be modelled.

–          IFC is a text file and COBie is an Excel file in a prescribed format

–          IFC’s and COBie are a means of sharing information, that they have been used does not provide any warranty for the data quality. The same can be said for Revit, while it is a BIM, the data it contains is the data that the creator needed to model for their task and no more.

–          Example of a contractor client in the early days specifying a Revit model should be provided by the architect, because they believed Revit to be a BIM. What they received was a Revit model, but its function was to assist the Architect with the internal planning and window modulation. What the contractor hoped for was something to use for clash checking and measuring materials.

In this blog we want to distinguish between the ‘free’ building information model and one that will pay real dividends over the life of the facility.

BIM provides what’s called an object-oriented digital representation of a building. Unlike two-dimensional traditional CAD (computer aided design) drawings, the model is not a collection of lines on the screen, but a compilation of data that describes — and shows graphically — the functional and physical aspects of a building and its components.  The model will include the dimensions and w structural characteristics of beams, the fire-rating of partitions — even the warranties on mechanical equipment

The purpose of BIM is to provide coordinated, reliable information about a project from design through construction and into operations.

There are many definitions of BIM these points summarise the current intent and technological capability.

  • Help architects and project teams improve visualisation
  • Increase coordination between the many parties involved in any project
  • Improve productivity by making it easier to retrieve information
  • Embed and link together essential information

 

We have been creating BIM for 20 years; we just didn’t call it that!

It has been our ambition to create a single model containing all the information we knew about a project and now we could do it. The model would evolve from the original brief through feasibility, design and into construction.

For hospitals, there are two key elements of the documentation. Firstly, room data and furniture and equipment schedules, and secondly, a drawn plan and elevations of each room.

The cad drawings were 2D, and we needed to draw room elevations individually, for which we still had to use an army of students. CodeBook allowed us to automate the drawing of the elevations, so that these could be rapidly and accurately produced. These drawings were called ‘C’ sheets.

For the purpose of Architects designing a layout and ensuring all equipment could be accommodated, and the tradesmen carrying out the construction, these drawings were highly suitable. However, they did not address the needs of the health professionals who needed to appraise the design and sign off the rooms, who more often than not are not familiar with reading technical drawings.

When the film Toy Story was released, with its computer created graphics, the cry went up, why can’t 3D C Sheets be created.  The computer resource available to an Architect’s office couldn’t match Pixar, but this was not the entire reason that 3D C Sheets involved a rethink of design process. When we look at Toy Story, we can see that the key characters in the foreground are modelled in great detail; the backgrounds are unfocussed and much less detailed, which reduced the computer resource needed to do the rendering.  The equivalent needs to be done with the architectural model.

The technology available to Architects has improved, but we still only do 3D views of key rooms, and these will often not include all the outlets and the detail of other items will often be surface only. The reason we draw attention to this, is to highlight that a model that might appear to be highly detailed may include compromises for reasons of economy or otherwise, and will only show the detail needed for its purpose.

Useful data is not going to be free

BIM is a catch all term for a collection of information about the project.  We hope we have illustrated the data available and depth of detail will vary throughout the design and construction process. Some data will be superseded, some will be enriched. But one thing for sure, is that the only data that will exist in the model is data that has been useful to someone to achieve their role within the process.  Some of this will be useful to the building owner, but the key data required may not be there.

We all can see that as a concept there are great benefits of creating a database with detailed knowledge of our facility. But in view of the cost of collection and maintaining the model, we should be clear as to our goals.

A BIM generated through design software such as Revit or Autocad is essentially a record of what has been designed and built. To that extent it is a somewhat monochromatic representation. We have seen that it starts with the design. On one plane, it defines what is there, what now exists as a building or set of buildings.

But it does not provide context, or usage or future evolution. It doesn’t provide a continuing narrative of the building’s life for the owners and for those whose task it is to service and care for the building.  This will be different for each facility and building owner, but I would suggest broadly fall under the headings of cost savings or improved performance of FM teams.  They could include better environmental control, preventative maintenance planning, predicting budgets needed for replacing deprecated assets.

One might be tempted to say, because of the items mentioned in the previous question. But it is important to quantify the benefits identified. Useful data is not going to be free, so a cost benefit analysis should be carried out.  There is no substitution for a careful analysis of the building owner’s processes and an analysis of the major maintenance expenditure. In the case of the motor company described earlier, they had identified a major cost.

How to feed information to Maximo, a detailed FM system for managing work orders and the day to day management of a facility, that justified the cost of the data collection.

– Although in the best time honoured tradition, they are hoping the contractors will carry the cost, as it will be part of their terms of engagement!

The sixty million dollar question and care should be taken – Software developers and their resellers who inflate the benefits of specific tools or claim that their product is ‘a comprehensive BIM solution’.

Clients/owners who demand a BIM product/service which they may not understand or – if delivered to them – do not have the internal capability to properly utilize and maintain.  Creating the BIM isn’t a one off process, started and finished during construction, but needs to be maintained and kept up to date.  Therefore, do not just consider the cost of creation, but maintenance.  If the maintenance cost is very high, then might will not be carried out, and as I will illustrate with a case study in a moment.

Case Study (1)

With a complex building such as a hospital, proving that building as handed over to the building owner is fit for purpose is a major task. Ensuring compliance is a lengthy and costly exercise, involving confirmation and validation of the FFE and Room properties such as finishes, ventilation, acoustics etc. have been achieved.

Skanska used the CodeBook databases with some hand held computers on site running Artra software throughout the construction recording the actual as built properties, allowing them to prove compliance to a level not achievable previously.

All this is fine, but the data held within the BIM was the data relevant to Skanska’s construction deliverables, and much key information that the building managers need may not have been collected.  A separate organisation is responsible for the long term management of the facility, and only now are they considering what data they require.

 

Case Study (2)

A different project, with which we have been involved, is a large car manufacturer. They realised that creating the data that their facilities managers needed was very expensive, and not very accurate. Being created from the designer’s drawings and contractors operations manuals.

An issue that they identified was that that the designers drawings were representational, and did not give the detail of the assets needed for the maintenance engineers. The contractor’s operations manual has more technical data about the assets, but often these could not be related to the location of the assets.

The solution they selected was to use CodeBook to collect a list of assets from multiple design environments. They were not in a position to define the cad or bim tools used by the design teams or contractors. CodeBook can build the asset leads from the key cad platforms, AutoCad, MicroStation, ArchiCad and Revit.

A study was done, by their FM people, who were asked to identify what data they needed. They came up with a list of several hundred parameters. It was quickly realised, that collecting these was not going to be practical or economic.  So they focussed on the key drivers that were needed, and decided to restrict their model to the Mechanical Engineering equipment. The number of parameters to be collected to 20.

Some of these, would be collected by the contractors procurement departments in the office, for instance manufacturers and supplier details and probably the most important ones would  be collected on site, for instance, model number, serial number, date of installation (warranties commence), commissioning status.  Operations Manuals and ‘As built’ drawings have usually been an afterthought, being cobbled together from what information is easily available, rather than a true record of the building.

Without forward thinking, a BIM model will be the same.

Case Study (3)

There is a large hospital in the UK, approximately 6,000 rooms, that has been open 10 years. The architects created a detailed design using CodeBook comprising cad drawings and databases of the assets.  The hospital trust employ a specialist Facilities Management company to provide both preventative and day to day maintenance of the assets in the hospital. Each year, the contract price is based on the asset register of 10 years ago. Over that time, many assets will have been deprecated and replaced. The health trust will have bought new equipment, not originally included. The FM company are maintaining equipment that shouldn’t be their responsibility, and some of the replacement equipment will have warranties that they are unaware of, and so pay for repairs that could be reclaimed.

Using CodeBook Mobile, they are about to carry out a full audit of the hospital, to record salient equipment details, and photograph the asset and its location where pertinent. Once completed, they will then ensure that each time a maintenance engineer replaces or modifies an asset, it will be recorded. This project will be of considerable benefit to all the parties concerned, allowing better budgeting and forward planning for equipment maintenance and replacement.

 

Conclusion

A useful Building Owners BIM model is not without cost, it isn’t a by-product of the design and construction process.  It needs to be planned and budgeted, with specific requirements and must be built into the initial terms of engagement.

A BIM generated through design software such as Revit or Autocad is essentially a record of what has been designed and built. It defines what is there, what now exists as a building or set of buildings. The contractor adding to the BIM procurement and compliance information, will add richness to the model. But may still lack much of the data needed for daya to day operation of the facility.

It does not provide context. Or usage. Or future evolution. It doesn’t provide a continuing narrative of the building’s life for the owners and for those whose task it is to service and care for the building.

CodeBook Releases Room Data Sheet (RDS) Creator

News release

 

May 27, 2014

 

CodeBook Releases Room Data Sheet (RDS) Creator Revit® App – Introductory Offer US$ 69.00

May 27, 2014, London, UK: CodeBook Solutions Inc. (CBS) launches its newest Revit® app in a series making workflow simpler, quicker and reducing workload increasing productivity.

CBS Flex Documenter creates .doc and .pdf Room Data Sheets (RDS) using parameters read from the rooms inside a Revit® model. The Room Data Sheet (RDS) can include both text and a jpg picture of the room and is available for download on Autodesk Exchange.

CBS Flex Documenter is available for the introductory cost of US$69.00. Available for Download via Autodesk Exchange and enterprise pricing enquiries contact CBS directly.

CBS is developing a series of Revit® apps to create a set of tools aimed at making working with Revit® easier and quicker.

RDSCreater

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information, contact:

Andy Hamer, CEO CodeBook Solutions Inc – tel: +1 858 605 1522 / + 44 (0) 1276 537 282, mob: +44 (0) 7912 869 976, email: andy.hamer@codebookinternational .com

Editor’s notes

Codebook International (www.codebookinternational.com) developed its first software application in the early 1990s and has been providing software solutions to design teams, contractors and building owners worldwide ever since. CodeBook International combines software development expertise and the experience of construction industry professionals. The CodeBookPro database application manages information from project inception through to facility management after project completion. Interoperable with industry standard CAD and BIM tools, CodeBookPro links to models, shares data and gives detailed reports and validations throughout the design and construction phases of a project. On completion the building owner takes possession of a detailed room information database linked to the 3D building model.

CodeBook Solutions Inc is a US-based business set up to provide a single source of sales, consultancy and support for North American architecture, engineering and construction and operation (AECO) customers.

Data migration, Acad to Revit

Historic Projects/data? Data migration can be a nightmare when transitioning between CAD platforms. We see a lot of projects starting out with Autocad and then being moved to Revit and one of the questions we get asked is how do we move our data as quickly and easy from one platform to another?

Logistically this can be a nightmare, 2d Acad blocks need to be converted in to Revit families of the correct type, room polylines need to be re-created in Revit, data needs to be re-checked and validated and then of course, the complete model then needs to be re-loaded with the new Revit family’s. This can be days to weeks’ worth of work.

What If I said we can take the pain away from this? The Acad data doesn’t even need to have been created with CodeBook!

For this blog I’m going to make the assumption that you are familiar with CodeBook and I’m going to split the workflow into easy to manage chunks.

1)       Getting the Autocad data, you will need CodeBook v12 and Autocad 2014.

2)       Getting the data in to CodeBook, you will need to build a project database from excel so we have a set of rooms to link to Acad, this can be generated quickly from an XLS list of rooms and codes.

3)       Linking CodeBook to the Autocad rooms, once we have created the CodeBook rooms, we now need to link these to the Acad spaces/polylines to identify room boundaries. We will use this to identify which equipment belongs to which room, and use the boundary data to create the Revit rooms later. Once CodeBook has been linked, A synchronise process then needs to be performed.

4)       Adding the Acad items to CodeBook, Now CodeBook is linked to Acad, the next step is to build a CodeBook library from the 2d Acad blocks in the drawing. You will need to select the library editor “add items” and chose the option “From a cad file of plan views”:

acad1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This will then create an XLS to which you can add codes to, grp, fix heights ect and batch add to the CodeBook library.

5)       Rename the Acad blocks to match CodeBook, Now we have a loaded equipment library from the 2d Autocad blocks, we have to jump back in to the drawing we loaded from and batch rename them to the new naming structure. This sounds more complicated than it is! This is so CodeBook can schedule to get the positions and rotation data. To Do this select Manage > Rename Blocks > “Using Code” :

acad2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6)       After this is complete, save, and then update the designed equipment lists (Home > Update FF&E lists)  CodeBook now has a 2d block in the library, and knows where it exists in the Acad drawing and knows which room this item belongs to.

Close CodeBook and Acad, and Open Revit with CodeBook in Revit mode.

We have everything we now need from the Revit drawings to move this data over to Revit.

7)       Once CodeBook is open and Revit is open, Use the option on the Room Tasks to “Create Revit Rooms and Boundary’s”

acad3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This will translate the Acad poly lines in to Revit rooms and boundary’s.

8)       Now we need to convert the equipment in to Revit RFA’s so we chose the option to “Covert Acad to Revit”  from the manage tab, CodeBook will now convert all of the 2d Acad blocks in to 3d faced items based on the parametric data derived from the Acad block. The Revit family type used can be specified based on the class, or the group of each item.

acad3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9)       The final Step is them to get CodeBook to place these converted items from the positional data obtained in Acad, We can do this by using the Room Tasks > Load Designed Equipment (level by level)

acad5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now all that’s left to do is Sync and update the FF&E lists. All you’re Acad data now has been ported over to Revit.

The process looks complex, but in the grand scheme of porting over the data manually, it’s much quicker and constant in terms of output results.

Tips and tricks, Room image layouts

It’s fair to say not all users are going to be using Revit with CodeBook, a lot of data manipulation is performed in CodeBook with the editor never actually seeing the Room as laid out in Revit.

CodeBook now has the function to make visible the room layout to CodeBook users regardless of their Revit use. We have made a number of changes to the Room editor and taken on user feedback to improve the status information we provide

At a glance we can now see an image of the room layout as in Revit, any update or pertinent room notes as well as basic but important information like sync dates, progress and percentage complete.

 

roomdataimage

Door scheduling, tips and tricks

Door scheduling,

A topic that’s not covered very much is door scheduling. It’s often thought as difficult and time consuming. Hopefully this overview should go some way to alleviate these fears.

We can cover this in a number of stages

1)      Door Template, Building a template

Building the templates is the very first stage in this process, the template manager for the doors is available via the build > Templates option on the Door tab.

door1

Here the baseline settings for each door can be specified.

2)      Adding a door to a room.

It’s important to remember that a template does not equal a door. A door can be added to the room with its data set independent of a template, while this can be done its recommended templates are utilised.

Doors can be added to rooms in a number of ways

a)      A door can be added via the Room Editor

b)      Doors can be assigned via Room template use

 

3)      Applying data to a door

a)      Using a template, a template can be assigned in the room editor or specified using a room type template. Alternatively via an XLS on bulk.

b)      Data can also been assigned manually via the door tab in the room editor

door2

4)      Linking and syncing

Note* For reporting purposes the door does not need to be linked to BIM, this is only for validation.

Once data has been added to the door (or even before) CodeBook needs to be linked to the door in Revit. Again, this can be done in a number of ways.

a)      A door can be linked using the Room editor > Doors > Link to BIM

door3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

b)      On bulk they can be linked using the “Door Links” tool on the Home tab

 

5)      Door parameter mapping

If required CodeBook can now take the Door Information held in CodeBook and pass that to the BIM model, or copy from the BIM model and pass this back in to Codebook.

This data can be used for validation or driving of the door schedule.

To choose the data to be shared open the project settings and select parameter mapping:

door4

 

6)      Door reporting.

Once all the templates and data have been setup, the doors have been linked (or not as this isn’t necessary for the reporting) a number of reports can be created from the Reporting section of CodeBook.

 

door5

 

 

CodeBook Pro – Intelligent Room Data Management May 13 2014, London, UK / San Diego, USA

News release

 

May 13, 2014 

CodeBook Pro V12

 

 CodeBook Pro – Intelligent Room Data Management

May 13 2014, London, UK / San Diego, USA

CodeBook International will be showing off CodeBook Pro Version 12 – a cutting edge enterprise solution for building information management (BIM) to Aussie CodeBook users.

Perth – Wednesday May 21st | Brisbane – Friday May 23rd | Sydney – Monday May 26th |

Melbourne – Wednesday May 28th

CodeBook Internationals’ founder and chief technical officer Peter Mann will be attending CBUG group meetings bringing users up to date with V12 developments and development plans for V13 and beyond.

CodeBook Pro manages information from project inception through to facilities management for all building types and sizes. Working with industry standard CAD and BIM tools, CodeBook links to models, shares data and gives detailed reports and validations throughout the design and construction phases of a project. On completion the building owner takes possession of a detailed room information database linked to the 3D[Peter L M1]  building model.

CodeBook Pro Version 12 launched in Q1’ 14 interfaces with the latest releases of leading design and BIM applications including Revit and AutoCAD. It supports Word, Excel and XML for reporting; Windows XP, 7 and 8 64-bit operating systems, and CodeBook offers Access and SQL Server database options.

Peter Mann, founder and CTO of CodeBook International, says:

“RTC is a unique opportunity for Revit users to get an independent overview of the whole Revit and BIM ecosystem. Its focus on ‘by users, for users’ reflects our own CodeBook philosophy as hands-on developers of software for design professionals by design professionals.

CodeBook International Limited, based in London, UK and CodeBook Solutions Inc., based in San Diego, USA and Resellers in Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Hong Kong and South Africa.

 

– ends –

 

For more information, contact:

 

Australia / New Zealand

Tessa Kingsbury, Director CodeBook Connect Pty Ltd – +61 (0) 410533324

tessa@codebookinternational.com

UK/ USA

Andy Hamer, CEO CodeBook International / CodeBook Solutions – Office: + 1 858 812 7711 / + 44 (0) 1276 537 282 / mob: +44 (0)7912 869976, email andy.hamer@codebookinternational.com

Editor’s notes

Codebook International (www.codebookinternational.com) developed its first software application in the early 1990s and has been providing software solutions to design teams, contractors and building owners worldwide ever since. CodeBook International combines software development expertise and the experience of construction industry professionals. The CodeBook application manages information from project inception through to facility management after project completion. Working with industry standard CAD and BIM tools, CodeBook links to models, shares data and gives detailed reports and validations throughout the design and construction phases of a project. On completion the building owner takes possession of a detailed room information database linked to the 3D building model.


 

CodeBook Pro V12 at RTC Australasia 2014

News release

 

May 09, 2014

 

CodeBook Pro V12 at
RTC Australasia 2014

 

 CodeBook Pro – Intelligent Room Data Management

May 09 2014, London, UK / San Diego, USA

CodeBook International will be showing off CodeBook Pro Version 12 it’s a cutting edge enterprise solution for building information modeling (BIM) on stand 14 at the 2014 Revit Technology Conference (RTC Australasia 2014) at Pullman Melbourne Albert Park Melbourne, Australia on May 29-31.

CodeBook Internationals’ founder and chief technical officer Peter Mann will attending the conference and manning the CodeBook stand throughout the conference.

CodeBook Pro manages information from project inception through to facilities management after project completion. Working with industry standard CAD and BIM tools, CodeBook links to models, shares data and gives detailed reports and validations throughout the design and construction phases of a project. On completion the building owner takes possession of a detailed room information database linked to the 3D[Peter L M1]  building model.

CodeBook Pro Version 12 launched in Q1’ 14 interfaces with the latest releases of leading design and BIM applications including Revit and AutoCAD. It supports Word, Excel and XML for reporting; Windows XP, 7 and 8 64-bit operating systems, and CodeBook offers Access and SQL Server database options.

Peter Mann, founder and CTO of CodeBook International, says:

“RTC is a unique opportunity for Revit users to get an independent overview of the whole Revit and BIM ecosystem. Its focus on ‘by users, for users’ reflects our own CodeBook philosophy as hands-on developers of software for design professionals by design professionals.

 

CodeBook International Limited, based in London, UK and CodeBook Solutions Inc, based inSan Diego, USA and Resellers in Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Hong Kong and South Africa.

– ends –

For more information, contact:

Andy Hamer, CEO CodeBook International / CodeBook Solutions – Office: + 1 858 812 7711 / + 44 (0) 1276 537 282 / mob: +44 (0)7912 869976, email andy.hamer@codebookinternational.com

Editor’s notes

Codebook International (www.codebookinternational.com) developed its first software application in the early 1990s and has been providing software solutions to design teams, contractors and building owners worldwide ever since. CodeBook International combines software development expertise and the experience of construction industry professionals. The CodeBook application manages information from project inception through to facility management after project completion. Working with industry standard CAD and BIM tools, CodeBook links to models, shares data and gives detailed reports and validations throughout the design and construction phases of a project. On completion the building owner takes possession of a detailed room information database linked to the 3D building model.


 

Do projects benefit from centralizing and rationalizing data from hundreds of rooms across multiple models?

Do projects benefit from centralizing and rationalizing data from hundreds of rooms across multiple models?

 

BIM Landscape – Growing adoption by the willing and implementation by the less willing!

Project datasets are growing exponentially and will continue to accelerate.  Growth is generated by (1) BIM implemented because of the perceived benefits it brings on current and future projects, (2) increasing number of projects where BIM is a mandated requirement , (3) increased data capture, reporting and analysis mandated contractually and (4) owner demands for additional data required to be capture data for facility management purposes.

 

It’s the Data – Mountains of it and its growing!

Our experience indicates a typical room with room, FFE, Doors and MEP data contains conservatively 5,000 pieces of data. Using this figure on the CHUM the largest project CodeBook Pro is currently used on it has 15,000 rooms and 500,000 equipment items equals over 75 million pieces of data which must be captured, tracked and validated.

 

Do you have the right tool for the job – From Brief to Handover?

Excel Centric Working

So yes they are cheap, familiar and simple to use and can be built to perform low level database functions with linking worksheets. Lookup tables etc., however, they unlikely to be robust, secure or efficient enough to handle the datasets we are seeing and expected in the future.

You could decide to develop your own in-house Excel based spreadsheet tool with management agreement or developed unofficially by local offices and well-meaning team members.  The question you have ask yourself is should the success of your business and project mission critical tasks be completed by a tool which is likely to be undocumented, difficult to support when the “developer” has moved on and distracting staff from their real work.

Nor will a suite of professionally developed Excel based spreadsheet tools offer all necessary tools and functionality to manage increasingly high volumes of complex data from brief to handover.  Plus not one of these developers provides all the functionality required to data handle from brief to handover.  Trying to solve this issue by mixing and matching Excel spreadsheet tools from different vendors in an attempt to achieve a suite of tools comes with its own inherent issues and problems such as working with multiple user interfaces which are all different and the real major issue of how and what format to transfer data between tools.

Ask yourself are Excel spreadsheet tools really suitable for a federated or collaborative workflow environment and mission critical tasks with serve financial and contractual consequences where true multi-tasking and multi- user access are needed when working on a common project dataset.

Database Centric Working

Do you build your own in-house tool or invest in an off the shelve solution?  There is a tendency in the industry to think its only “data” how difficult can it be to design our own system, its free and it will do exactly what we want.

Where we have completed against an in-house design solution we have found the client has significantly underestimate the skills, resources, time needed and complexity of developing API’s necessary to facilitate transfer of data between the CAD/BIM platforms and these solutions have very limited functionality required to do complete the necessary project tasks.

The implications, issues and problems with developing in-house Excel spreadsheet based tools are as relevant to in-house database based solutions.

 

CodeBook has been a database centric room data trail blazer and evangelist for years. Even before data management become fashionable with the launch of “BIM” so you could say we have been “doing” BIM for years, we just didn’t have a three letter abbreviation for what we did.

CodeBook continues to be a head of the curve with functionality and processes to handle larger and large datasets and our deep understanding of needs of users ensures CodeBook Pro offers all the tools in one solution needed to transport the data along is journey from brief to handover.

CodeBook Pro is the bench mark tool for the efficient and cost effective data capture, management and validation.  We meet the needs of every AEC professional at every project stage from inception to handover and we have more years’ experience in developing functionality than any other vendor on the market.

In this market experience accounts for everything you need to know the people behind the solution really have experience the daily ups and downs and frustrations associated with taking a project from brief to handover on some the complex and large projects.  CodeBook has development team headed by an architect with over 35 years’ experience.

 

CodeBook Pro – Intelligent Room Data Management

Our world leading solution is based on a proven data management methodology designed and developed by seasoned AEC professionals with real hands on project experience.  CodeBook Pro has been used by leading AEC professionals and organisations across the globe for over 20 years on all building types, complexity and size.

Our powerful enterprise solution delivers structured, centralised, rationalised and verified data from brief to handover and interoperability with all major CAD and BIM.  CodeBook Pro’s simple and easy to use user interface provides access to a most comprehensive suite of functionality available equipping users to work on any size of project regardless of size, complexity or sector:

 

 
During Projects
  • Simple process for importing client briefs containing Schedules of Accommodation (SoA) and Equipment (SoE)
  • Manage data stored centrally across multiple CAD / BIM models and platforms
  • Synchronize and validate data with CAD/BIM Platforms identify differences between brief and drawing
  • Create and update room templates  to manage multiple rooms from a single managed data source
  • Edit data at room level with visual indicator to easily identify changes from template
  • Track changes and reasons to room data
  • Quality control through data verification and validation
  • Load and update individual rooms, FFE and MEP data or and / or batch load
  • Report creation using centralised room and equipment libraries rationalizing data management with standard and / or customisable report outputs
  • Create room layouts and automatically produces room elevations
  • From brief to handover incrementally capture data for owner import into CAFM
  • And much more …….

 

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Future Projects
  • Using knowledge captured and validated data from previous projects
  • Quicker and easier project set up
  • Enterprise-wide best practice availability in sector based room template, room and equipment libraries
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Book Your Demo Today!

See how CodeBook Pro can quickly and easily revolutionize your BIM data workflow today and ensure your organisation is ready for the increasing data management challenges tomorrow

Call Andy Hamer (+1 858 812 7711 / + 44 (0) 1276 537 282 / + 44 (0) 7912 869 976), Skype (andyhamer) or email andy.hamer@codebookinternational.com